With thousands of ad firms wanting your business, how can you choose? Experts explain how to set your goals, put it in an RFP, and snag the best creative team.

Long gone are the days of a handful of Madison Avenue firms controlling the advertising world. Shopping for an advertising agency is no longer done in smoke-consumed boardrooms and martini bars. With the advances of technology and the introduction of digital methods, the advertising world has changed drastically since the 1960s. Thousands of wildly different agencies exist—from 10-men experimental shops in Brooklyn to enormous traditional firms with a global reach, and everything in between. Terms like “experiential marketing” or “social media” that were relatively unknown a decade ago—much less five decades ago—are now crucial considerations. Of course, ideas are still the foundation of creative work, but other key factors play a role in forming a valuable relationship between a company and its advertising agency.

Marketing Luxury Products To The High-End Consumer

The first step is to understand that in the so-called luxury market, there are three possible strategies, which which we categorize as luxury, fashion and premium. The difference between these three strategies is big. It does not change much in the eyes of most basic consumers, at least in the short-term. But when one has to manage a brand, the difference is pivotal. In fact, if you decide to implement a fashion or a premium strategy, the classical marketing styles works pretty well. But if you decide to implement a luxury strategy, you need to reconsider all the aspects of your marketing management.

There are many reasons for rebranding.

How much could your company benefit from a timely rebranding exercise? The business rebrand is about a great deal more than making your business look good. It’s about making your bottom line look good, too.

The important factors to consider when assessing the value of a rebrand include equity measurement; market differentiation and accessibility; brand awareness, relevance and vitality; and consumer personality, preference, usage, associations, and emotional connectivity. If your company can improve its relationship to its customer base in any or all of these key areas, you may want to think seriously about rebranding.

1. Gain competitive advantage

Your brand is the public face of your business. A well-executed rebrand can allow your company to reflect current market dynamics and gain competitive advantage, accelerate pipeline performance and become a leading voice in your industry. Sidestep the competition and increase your market share through an updated image. By revisiting your brand messaging, you can counter a loss in consumer confidence and/or decreased profitability.

The Power of Packaging at the Doorstep

Brands need to explore new packaging strategies in the era of online delivery to keep consumers coming back for more.

Packaging offers a way to establish brand identity and create personalized consumer experiences. But in the era of online delivery, shouldn’t brands do a lot more to give online shoppers more compelling and on brand packaging experiences—right on the consumer’s doorstep? In today’s economic environment, after all, brands are competing as much on the experiences they offer as the products they sell.

We all saw the numbers for the 2014 holiday season: more online purchases than ever. By 2018, nearly one-half of CPG growth—a total take of $35 billion in sales

Top Mistakes Marketers Make When Rebranding

Most marketers evolve their brands over time to keep them relevant. Some do it well, while others become the target of cynical bloggers. To gear your next rebrand for success, sidestep these all-too-common mistakes:

Clinging to history.
Rebranding well means staying relevant. Assumptions made when the brand was established may no longer hold true. Analyze changes in target markets when exploring opportunities for brand expansion, repositioning and revitalization.

Thinking the brand is the logo, stationery or corporate colors.
Brands encompass everything from customer perception and experience to quality, look and feel, customer care, retail and web environments, the tone and voice of communications, and more.

Branding Glossary Toolbox

Abstract Name: A name that is entirely invented and has no meaning of its own.

Associative Name: A name that alludes to an aspect or benefit of the product or the company.

Brand: A brand is a mixture of attributes, tangible and intangible, symbolized in a trademark, which, if managed properly, creates value and influence.

Branding: Selecting and blending tangible and intangible attributes to differentiate the product, service or corporation in an attractive, meaningful and compelling way. The identification of a product, service or offer with the parent company.

Brand Architecture: How an organization structures and names the brands within its portfolio. There are three main types of brand architecture systems: monolithic, where the corporate name is used on all products and services offered by the company; endorsed, where all sub-brands are linked to the corporate brand by means of either a verbal or visual endorsement; and freestanding, where the corporate brand operates merely as a

10 Reasons Your Marketing Plan Will Fail

Right now thousands of companies are working on putting together their marketing plans for the upcoming.

In November and December, thousands of companies will finalize their marketing plans.

If you are not done preparing a year end marketing plan, or if you are not in the midst of writing one, you are behind the eight ball.

To help you put together a marketing plan for next year, here’s a reminder of top 10 reasons that marketing plans crash and burn.

1. No written marketing plan.
An obvious one, but if you don’t take the time to create a marketing plan, your marketing will flounder in 2012.

Top Mistakes Marketers Make When Rebranding

Smart marketers evolve their brands over time to keep them relevant. Some do it well, while others tend to cry over spilled milk.. To gear your next rebrand for success, sidestep these all-too-common mistakes:

1. Hanging on to history.
Rebranding well means staying relevant. Assumptions made when the brand was established may no longer hold true. Analyze changes in target markets when exploring opportunities for brand expansion, repositioning and revitalization.

2. Thinking the brand is the logo, stationery or corporate colors.
Brands encompass everything from customer perception and experience to quality, look and feel, customer care, retail and web environments, the tone and voice of communications, and more.

Shake Weights Viral Storm

Few products have ever made as much of a splash as the Shake Weight, a dumbbell-like product that debuted in 2009. Versions of the Shake Weight’s direct-response TV ad have racked up more than 3.8 million views on YouTube. The informercial has also inspired a parody on Saturday Night Live, Jimmy Kimmel Live and logged hundreds of appearances on other TV talk shows including Ellen which has more then 4.3 million views. All of the unexpected attention has helped propel FitnessIQ, the company behind the $19.95 product, to more than 70 million in sales.


Complimentary Brand Evaluation

BRAND EVALUATION

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